‘Shifting Perspectives’ with Carrie Iverson & Jeremy Scidmore

SHIFTING PERSPECTIVES

4 – 13 March 2014

Cost: £850 (includes course fees, materials and evening meals)

“There is rarely one visual experience of an image but rather a series of encounters that shift depending on how and from where the image is viewed…”

Carrie Iverson and Jeremy Scidmore will use the techniques of printing and kiln formed glass to investigate these shifting perspectives creating images that do not describe a single viewpoint but are multi-layered descriptions of an object or idea.

Using a scientific model of research and focused experimentation, students will learn strategies to develop new work. We will move through a series of exercises to collect, cull, produce, edit and then
refine material. Processes include drawing, photography, printmaking on glass, and open-faced kiln casting of textures and found objects.

Field trips around Lybster will provide inspiration while new assignments, exercises and discussions each day will build on and refine previous skills. In addition to learning printmaking for glass and glass kiln casting, students will develop research practices and strategies for refinement that can be applied to any art form.

This class is appropriate for all levels.

For application details and to book a place email Grace at info@northlandsglass.com or call 01593 721 229

About the Artists:

Carrie Iverson received her BA from Yale University and her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has exhibited nationally and internationally, including at the Glasmuseum Hentrich in Düsseldorf, Germany, Art Sante Fe, the Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art in Chicago, and the Chicago Cultural Center.  Her work is in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Modern Art (NY), and the Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago). She has taught at Bullseye Glass Company (Oregon and California), GlassForum (Norway), Creative Glass (Switzerland and UK), as well as private studios throughout the US.

Jeremy Scidmore earned a BFA at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and later returned to SAIC in order to study Arts Administration and Policy. While in Chicago, he owned and managed a public glass-arts resource center, collaborated with youth arts educators, completed private and public sculptural and architectural art commissions, and taught glassblowing and kilnforming. Scidmore joined Bullseye Glass Company in 2011 and is now the Studio Coordinator and Instructor for Bullseye Resource Center Bay Area.

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Summer Symposium

We have been delighted to welcome students from Alberta College of Art and Design, Montana State University & Rochester Institute of Technology for their 9-day Summer Symposium, 24 June to 2 July, along with their professors Natali Rodrigues, Tad Bradley and David Schnuckel and Facilitator Jane Bruce.

Summer Symposium group

They’ve been out and about visiting sites around Caithness, working hard in the Studio and enjoying getting to know the village and the locals. We hope to see you back in Lybster very soon.

Class of 2013

Students Jon Rees and Daniel Cleghorn talk about their experience:

Jon Rees, Rochester Institute of Technology student:

“The journey to a new place far from home can be a daunting one.  You never know quite what to expect.  The town of Lybster and North Lands Creative Glass are true gems in the weathered landscape of Northern Scotland.  There are two things that I find really special about them; the place and the people.

The landscape in and around the town is spectacular.  From the weather hewn cliffs of the many harbors and beaches to the stone Cairns at Camster, this area of Scotland is all stone and sea and wind.  The constant interaction between these elements creates a sense of unparalleled awe.  To stay and work in this type of environment is truly a transformative experience.

The people, both at North Lands and around town are the friendliest people I’ve ever met.  Generosity and humor are the most common traits to be found in the personalities here.  From interesting conversations to hilarious stories, it’s obvious that the people of this area of Scotland are very welcoming to visitors.

I’m sad to be leaving soon, but I’m very much looking forward to visiting again.”

Out and about

“My name is Daniel Cleghorn. Currently attending the Alberta College of Art + Design in Calgary Alberta Canada and in Lybster Scotland for the student glass symposium presented by North Lands Creative Glass. This is my first experience with working in glass.

The community within Lybster and the Studio is like no other. Strangers coming together to help each other throughout the process of creation. From the idea bouncing to the finished product. Even the environment contributes to the art, drawing, inspiration from the landscape and the people of the town all contribute to the finished piece.The pieces I am working with are all created from the contrast of city life to this small town. The first one is Guessa based on the idea of honour bound tradition. What has inspired me is how the local have reacted to us, with them almost feeling obligated to buy a drink and have a conversation and ensure we have a good time. It is something you have to experience.

The second work is Rustic Modern, inspired by the landscape. By taking shell and rock castings, translating some into glass and keeping the others in their original state, I hope to investigate the difference between a wild coast and the modern city.

The symposium itself is more than glass work; it’s about pushing yourself, exploration and communication. For even the more experienced glass artist 9 days is hard to get much glass done due to the lengthly nature of the medium, and we’re not restricted to glass, we can do anything. One of things that really inspired me about this time is how it isn’t a class. It’s about pushing yourself to do work when you have so many options. Giving you a little taste of art outside of school, exploring your limits with the medium and the land.  Seeing more than any tour bus would take you, exploring with your peers and yourself of the capabilities of your ideas and work and most importantly communication. With such a diverse background and amazing instructors there is so much to learn in such little time.

Thank you all for the amazing experience
Jane, Natali, David, Tad, Tatara, Kalina, Jon, Cydney, Dani, Randy, Sawyer,
Jess, Blair, Jo, Michael, Grace and the whole town for being such great host.”

Out and about again

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Conference 2013. ‘The Real Thing: Beyond Stereotyping’

This year’s Conference will be held on Saturday 7, Sunday 8 September. It explores cultural identities and features Master Class leaders along with notable international speakers from the world of arts and culture.

What delegates from the 2012 Conference said:

‘Esoteric, informative, thought provoking…your whole program inspires creative thinking’ – Susan Stinsmuehlen-Amend

‘Thoroughly enjoyed, highly informative and diverse lectures’ – Amanda Simmons

‘There was brilliant combination of speakers with diverse points of view’ – Jacqueline Poncelet

‘Each time I welcome the mix of speakers and particularly enjoyed the theme this year…the conference is very worthwhile and I find that the themes are relevant to me and that I gain a greater insight not only into what is happening in glass but in the wider art scene’ – Rose Watban

‘It is intellectually and artistically stimulating. Plus a great chance to network with other professionals and catch up with friends’ – Victoria Scholes

You can book your place through our website

Here is the full programme:

SATURDAY
9.15 Welcome, Opening Remarks
9.30 ‘Jewellery in the Age of Queen Victoria: A Mirror to the World’ – Keynote Presentation.
Judy Rudoe FSA has worked at the British Museum since 1974, specialising in jewellery, together with 19th and 20th century decorative arts. This lecture, drawn from her latest book Jewellery in the Age of Queen Victoria: A Mirror to the World, is the result of 30 years research, together with Charlotte Gere. Web resources produced a vast amount of totally unexpected information on jewellery with fish scales or live glow-worms or electrical batteries that enabled a death’s head to gnash its teeth and roll its eyes and why there was a craze for Colorado beetles in 1877. Queen Victoria’s own choice of jewellery was enormously influential, so what might seem a narrow subject acts as a key to our understanding of the Victorian age – its mourning rituals, its politics, its nationalism – all are embodied in its jewellery. Judy will focus on what jewellery meant to the people who wore it, in both public and private spheres, on the layers of meaning that jewellery could convey and on its function as a symbol of national identity, in particular the recreation of tradition in Scotland.
10.30 Morning Coffee
11.15 ‘Change and the Solitude of Detail’. Deborah Cocks (Master Class Leader) says: ‘As participants know, when a workshop begins there is a flurry of learning new techniques, acquiring new ideas and new friends. Then sometime, usually on day three, a quiet descends on the room as each of us works within our own space and thoughts; solitude within a group. It is a wonderful meditation where the new is added to the old. I think life is like this. We embrace or reject change, reflect on what has passed and retreat into the detail to make sense of it all. I hope what I make reflects this intricacy. I think this is where my talk will start.’
12.15 ‘Standing in the Maze’. Judy Tuwaletstiwa is a writer and a mixed media painter. Her paintings have been exhibited internationally and are part of numerous private, corporate and public collections. She says: ‘I grew up with immigrant Jewish grandparents in multi-cultural East Los Angeles. I lived many years in the woods of Northern California and on The Hopi Indian Reservation in Arizona. I now live in New Mexico. In the elemental landscape of the vast southwestern desert, a thin membrane separates the daily world from the world of the unconscious. I shall talk about that world and how I use what we all share…personal memory, cultural memory, biological memory, ethnic memory, mythic memory…to create the vocabulary that forms my art. I shall also discuss how glass has become an essential part of that vocabulary during the past year as Exchange Artist with Bullseye Glass.’
13.15 Lunch
14.30 ‘A Future for Mali’s Past’. The typical mud brick architecture of the city of Djenné is highly important for the cultural identity of the local Malian people and also recognised as of worldwide importance by UNESCO. It is listed as a World Heritage Site. Thus Djenné is not only awarded the international status it deserves, but the preservation of its monumental architecture becomes a common responsibility. In order to preserve this vulnerable architecture, constant maintenance and restoration work is essential. In addition, it is important that local knowledge of mud brick construction is not lost, and that the local people are made aware of the significance of their unique heritage. The Museum of Ethnology and the Malian Ministry of Culture have been working together since 1996 on the restoration of the architectural heritage in Djenné. Through restoring this historical architecture and providing work for local masons, the future of this remarkable cultural heritage is ensured for both Malian and foreign visitors to Djenné. Dr. Annette Schmidt studied Prehistory at the University of Leiden. She led an international excavation in Dia (Mali) and since 2002 she has been Curator of Africa at the Museum of Ethnology, Leiden.
15.30 ‘Weaving glass’. Anne-Lise Riond Sibony (Master Class Leader) says: ’Deep down, my work is not about glass, it is about weaving. My threads are material and immaterial. They are, for instance, emotions, memories, paintings, colours, volumes and many techniques… I weave together these threads that are of fundamentally different natures. As my work proceeds, some get the upper hand and others fade out, but all contribute to the fabric of glass and of meaning from which my pieces are made.’
16.30 Tea at Waterlines Visitor Centre, Lybster Harbour
18.00 Exhibition Preview: ‘Made In Lybster’. An exhibition of new works from the North Lands Creative Glass Collection of Contemporary Glass.
20.00 Dinner and Conference Party

SUNDAY

9.15 ‘From Mantelpiece to White Cube, Progression or Circumstance?’ Richard Slee (Master Class Leader) says: ‘This presentation will trace the ambitions and circumstances during my now long creative career. During this time I have travelled from producing a mural in Macedonia to initiating an ornament amnesty art event at an art fair in Middlesbrough. Have I shaped my practice or has my practice shaped me? In an art world where diversity is celebrated is the specialist maker still special?’
10.15 Morning Coffee
10.45 ‘The Art of Modern Tapestry’. Since it was founded in 1912, with weavers from William Morris’s workshops, Edinburgh’s Dovecot Studios have produced tapestries and rugs ranging from traditional wall hangings to experimental textile art. Often these have been made in partnership with famous painters. The success of this collaboration between artist and weaver has varied throughout the century. An artist might expect a design or painting to be ‘simply’ translated into textile, by matching colours and echoing brushwork. At best, however, weaver and artist can together evolve a new work in which the spirit of the initial design enters a quite new and sometimes unanticipated, even magical, dimension. Curator and historian, Elizabeth Cumming, explores the nature of modern tapestry and that crucial artist-weaver relationship via a range of tapestries designed with British and American artists from Graham Sutherland to Louise Nevelson, Eduardo Paolozzi to Frank Stella.
11.45 Demonstrations in the Alastair Pilkington Studio
13.15 Lunch
14.30 ‘Recorded Influences’. Eeva Käsper (Master Class Leader) says: ‘The theme of influences has accompanied me for several years. By mapping the influences which guide and affect us, we can better recognize their impact to our creative work. For me glass is the material of endless possibilities. My works are based on personal experience and are influenced by intermediate states of consciousness that are as abstract as the form I have chosen to express them. Fascinated to discover and record the states of mind that have originated in an emotional memory, my works of glass often describe a fragile contemplative environment of perception.’
15.30 Summing-up by Tina Oldknow, Curator of Modern Glass, Corning Museum of Glass.
16.00 Concluding remarks

The 2013 Conference is sponsored by Corning Incorporated, USA & Bullseye Glass Co

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Sandcasting Workshop with Artists-in-Residence

We teamed up with Caithness Horizons to offer a weekend workshop work through the process of sand casting of hot glass, from inspiration to kiln firing with our Artists-in-Residence.

Participants and artists spent Saturday afternoon at Caithness Horizons, looking for local inspiration amongst the museum’s collections of artefacts, particularly the four main areas of Picts, Vikings, Robert Dick and Dounreay. Sunday was spent in our Studio Hot Shop in Lybster learning the processes and techniques of sand casting. Everyone had a go at translating their ideas from the Saturday into sand moulds, making impressions in the sand to pour the hot glass into.
Participant Nicole Wilkinson: ‘[It was] amazing … how everyone placed their own interpretations and visions of Caithness inspiration into viable items. It was fascinating to learn the glass-making procedure and practice, and to view the residents’ work’.

 

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Master Class Programme Update

Unfortunately Tiina Sarapu is no longer able to come to North Lands for her class on 10-18 September. Our Artistic Director, Mieke Groot, asked Eeva Käsper to lead a class in Tiina’s place and we’re delighted that she agreed.

The details of Eeva’s class are as follows:

10-18 September:  ‘Influences’

We are often (always) influenced by something or someone. With this Master Class I invite the participants to discover and to map the influences which guide and affect us throughout our lives, or which are important to us at any given moment. By mapping them, we can better recognize their impact on ourselves as artists as well as find inspiration for our creative work. I am convinced that by working openly with the influences we experience, we can turn them in the direction that best suits us, and exploit them deliberately, even when they involve contradictions.

Sheet glass is a wonderful source material which, with the help of heat and gravitation, can transform from two-dimensional into three-dimensional, which enables playing with transparency, layers, surfaces and edges, surface structures, graphic images, reflections and optical distortions. Slumping techniques allow a lot of playfulness. In addition to various molds used in slumping, the process can also be interferred with during firing: one can influence it physically, or simply observe and end the process at a suitable moment.

Thanks to the transparency of glass, the finished work is always affected by its surroundings, and so further and unpredictable influences will come to bear on the final art piece.

Eeva Käsper

Click here to apply for Eeva’s Master Class on our website

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2013 Master Class and Conference Programme

Master Classes

28 Aug – 5 Sept: ‘Working the Surface – Texture, Detail, Stories and Patterns’
Deborah Cocks is regarded as one of Australia’s foremost exponents of reverse glass painting.This class will build a repertoire of glass painting techniques by experimenting with vitreous paints and silver stain in conjunction with cold techniques.

28 Aug – 5 Sept: ‘The Gravity of the Objects’
Anne-lise Riond Sibony is one of France’s most innovative artists working with glass. This class will concentrate on small-scale installations and compositions made from an assemblage of non-identical elements. The main technique will be blowing – from free-blown shapes to painted mould-blown artefacts.

10 Sept – 18 Sept: ‘On the Edge of Knowing’
Tiina Sarapu is one of Estonia’s leading artists working in glass. The focus of this class will be on personal expression and vision. From first working with paper as the simulation material for glass, Tiina will explore different slumping techniques with sheet glass.

10 Sept – 18 Sept: ‘Unknowns’
Ceramic artist Richard Slee is one of british craft’s most compelling figures. He will lead this class in an exploration of free-formed blown glass, in partnership with the participants and with the expert help of artist and glassblower Richard Price.

International Conference – ‘The Real Thing: Beyond Stereotyping’
7 and 8 September

The Conference will explore cultural identities. Speakers will include the Master Class leaders; Keynote speaker Judy Rudoe FSA, author and curator at the British Museum, specialising in jewellery together with 19th and 20th century decorative arts; Judy Tuwaletstiwa, writer,mixed media painter from the US and during the past year Exchange Artist with Bullseye Glass; curator, writer and historian Elizabeth Cumming and Annette Schmidt, leader of an international excavation in Djenne Mali and Curator Africa at the Museum of Ethnology Leiden since 2002.

The Conference is sponsored by the Corning Incorporated, USA and is supported by Bullseye Glass Co.

Apply for Master Classes and book Conference places online

Print a booking form

Contact Grace MacBeath for any further information:
grace.macbeath@northlandsglass.com
Tel: 01593721229

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Glass Skills Classes

We have new Classes for 2013:

LAMP WORKING
11 – 13 march
Cost: £300

Ian Pearson will lead a three day introduction to the art of lamp working (using gas/oxygen torches to blow, manipulate and join glass tube and rod).

Ian has been practicing the skill known as lampworking since 1961, and is an acknowledged master of the craft bringing a mix of outstanding technical knowledge and creative flair. For many years a scientific glass blower creating highly complex laboratory equipment, Ian now uses his blend of ancient craft and modern technology to make art objects and gifts at his studio Glass Creations in Thurso.
This class is suitable for all skill levels and abilities.

CONTEMPORARY GLASS PAINTING AND LAYERING
27 – 31 May
Cost: £550

Jeff Zimmer will lead a five day class about creating three dimensional images on glass using both traditional and photographic approaches.  The class will exploit the transparency of glass and layer techniques and images to collage and create a sense of space.  Hand painted enamels, photo-sensitive sandblast resists and printed transfers will be used.The experience will be enhanced through discussions and presentations. There will be discussion about how creating a 3-D image affects its content and our experience of it.

The course will be of interest to individuals looking to expand their practice into a new dimension.  Those with experience of image-making on glass will learn to see their work in a new way while those new to painting on glass will learn the both the basics of the craft and novel applications.

SCULPTURAL FLAMEWORKING TECHNIQUES
5 – 9 August
Cost: £550

Led by Carrie Fertig, this five day technical course will use the bench burner and hand torch to build skills for making sculpture in clear borosilicate glass. The course will cover general health and safety of the studio, torch, canisters of gas, and the flameworker, as well as building your own studio.

The course will teach use of the hand torch to enable larger-scale work. New assignments each day will build on and refine the previous skills learned. This course is suitable for all levels of experience.

CLICK HERE TO APPLY VIA OUR WEBSITE

For more information email grace.macbeath@northlandsglass.com

or call 01593 721 229

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